Location: PHPKode > scripts > PHPlot > phplot-5.8.0/Imagemaps.txt
phplot/ImageMaps.txt - Documentation for an experimental feature
Last updated for PHPlot-5.7.0 on 2012-02-20
The project home page is http://sourceforge.net/projects/phplot/
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Overview:

This file documents a new, experimental callback which allows scripts using
PHPlot to generate image maps with linked areas covering the plotted data.
This is planned for release in PHPlot-5.7.0 as a experimental feature.

    NOTICE:

    The callback documented in this file is experimental. This means
    anything about it may change in future releases, in ways that might
    be incompatible with the current implementation, or the feature might
    even be removed completely. The new feature is not yet documented in
    the PHPlot Reference Manual. This text file is the only documentation.

Feedback on this feature is welcome. Please use the "Help & Discussion"
forum at http://sourceforge.net/projects/phplot/

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Overview:

A new callback is introduced to make the device coordinates of plotted data
available to a calling script. (See the PHPlot Reference Manual for more on
callbacks, and device coordinates.) If a script registers a function as a
handler for the 'data_points' callback name, the function will be called
repeatedly when the plot is being generated. Each call will contain
parameters describing the graphics for the corresponding data point. These
parameters can be used to generate an image map.

This feature is most likely only useful when generating embedded image data
with PHPlot. Refer to the function reference for EncodeImage() in the
PHPlot Reference Manual for details on embedded image data. (See the Notes
at the end of this document for use with non-embedded images.)

The data_points callback works with the following plot types:
  + bars and stackedbars (both horizontal and vertical)
  + points and linepoints (both standard and error bar plots)
  + pie
  + bubbles
  + ohlc, candlesticks, and candlesticks2
No other plot type is supported. This includes lines, squared, thinbarline,
area, and stackedarea. (These plot types do not have well-defined areas
which could map to data points.)

The rest of this document contains details on the callback, usage with
each plot type, and examples.

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General Usage:

To register a callback function to handle 'data_points', use:
    $plot->SetCallback('data_points', 'my_handler', $my_arg);
where my_handler is the name of your function, $my_arg is an optional
additional argument to pass to your function ('my_handler').

The data_points callback function (my_handler above) will be called with 5
fixed-purpose arguments followed by variable arguments. The number and
purpose of the variable arguments depends on the plot type.  If your
handler only needs to work with one specific plot type, you can declare
these arguments in your function definition.

If your handler must handle multiple plot types, define your function
without arguments and use func_get_arg() or func_get_args() to access the
arguments.  You can use the value of the 3rd argument, $shape, to determine
the number and usage of the variable arguments, since there is one specific
function argument set for each value of $shape. See "Summary of data_points
callback parameters..." for details.

Here are the fixed arguments to the data_points callback:

  function my_handler($img, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column, ...)

    $img : The image resource (standard for all callbacks). Not typically
           used with a data_points callback.
    $passthru : Pass-through argument, supplied in the SetCallback() call
           (standard for all callbacks, referred to above as $my_arg). You
           can use this however you want, or ignore it.
    $shape : A word describing the shape of the area being described. Note:
           this does not always correspond to an HTML image map <area> shape.
           Each plot type passes a specific $shape value, and the $shape
           value defines the usage of the variable arguments.
    $row : The number of the data row being plotted. This typically corresponds
           to the ordinal of the X axis values, starting with 0 for the first
           point, 1 for the second point, etc.
    $column : The column, or data set index, starting with 0 for the first data
           set. This indicates which Y value for a given X, for example, or
           which bar within a bar group, or segment within a stacked bar.
           Always 0 for pie charts and OHLC plots, which only have a single
           data set.

For the variable arguments, refer to the sections below which describe each
plot type.

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Usage with bar and stackedbar plots:

With plot types 'bars' and 'stackedbars', an image map can be produced which
indicates the area of each bar or stacked bar segment. This works with
both vertical and horizontal plots.


Arguments to the 'data_points' callback for bar and stackedbar plots:

  function my_handler($img, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column,
                      $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2)
     The first 5 arguments are as described above for all plot types.
     $shape : is always 'rect'
     $row : This is the bar group index.
     $column : This is the bar index within a group. For vertical plot type
         'bars', index 0 is the left-most in the group. For vertical plot type
         'stackedbars', index 0 is the bar segment closest to the X axis.
     $x1, $y1 : Device coordinates of the upper left corner of a bar/segment.
     $x2, $y2 : Device coordinates of the lower right corner of a bar/segment.


Generating an image map for bar and stackedbar plots:

The provided $shape and coordinates are compatible with HTML <area> markup.

Here is an example of generating one area in an image map from a bar or
stackedbar plot. You must provide the URL, alternate text, and optionally
a title (tooltip text).  This appends the image map line to a string.
sprintf() is used to convert the coordinates to integers for cleaner HTML.

  $coords = sprintf("%d,%d,%d,%d", $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2);
  $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"rect\" coords=\"$coords\""
             .. " title=\"$title_text\" alt=\"$alt_text\" href=\"$url\">\n";

The $url, $title_text, and $alt_text would typically depend on the passed
$row and $column.

Refer to Example 1 in this document for a complete example.

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Usage with points and linepoints plots:

With plot types 'points' and 'linepoints', an image map can be produced
which indicates the area around each point. (The lines in a linepoints plot
are not part of the image map areas.) This also works with error plots that
use these plot types, however the error bars are not part of the image map
areas.

Arguments to the 'data_points' callback for points and linepoints plots:

  function my_handler($img, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column,
                      $x, $y)
     The first 5 arguments are as described above for all plot types.
     $shape : is always 'dot'
     $row : Row - the index for the independent variable (usually X)
     $column : Column - the index for the dependent variable (usually Y)
     $x, $y : Device coordinates of the center of the point marker.


Generating an image map for points and linepoints plots:

PHPlot provides only the center coordinates for each point marker. It
does not indicate the shape or size of the marker, nor the coordinates of
any line segments or error bars. To generate an image map, you should use a
fixed radius size and define the image map areas as circles with that
radius centered around each data point. You need to choose a radius. A
larger radius provides a larger clickable area, but the area of adjacent
points may overlap.

Here is an example of generating one area in an image map from a points
or linepoints plot. You must provide the URL, alternate text, and
optionally a title (tooltip text).  This appends the image map line to a
string.  sprintf() is used to convert the coordinates to integers for
cleaner HTML.  This example uses a 20 pixel radius for the areas around
each data point.

  define('MAP_RADIUS', 20); // Capture area circle radii
  $coords = sprintf("%d,%d,%d", $x, $y, MAP_RADIUS);
  $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"circle\" coords=\"$coords\""
             .. " title=\"$title_text\" alt=\"$alt_text\" href=\"$url\">\n";

The $url, $title_text, and $alt_text would typically depend on the passed
$row and $column.

Other than the above code, a script to generate an image map for a points or
linepoints plot would be similar to Example 1 in this document, which
produces a bar chart.

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Usage with pie charts:

With plot type 'pie', an image map can be produced which indicates the
area of each pie segment. However, PHPlot only supplies the values which
identify the outline of the pie segment, and HTML maps do not support areas
of this shape.  Therefore, the callback handler function needs to generate
one or more polygons which approximate the pie segment area.

Note: PHPlot does not attempt to draw pie segments that are too small (due to
the implementation of the PHP/GD drawing function). If a segment's calculated
start angle and end angle are equal (after converting to integers), the
segment will not be drawn, and the data_points callback will not be called for
that segment.


Arguments to the 'data_points' callback for pie charts:

  function my_handler($img, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column,
                      $x, $y, $pie_width, $pie_height,
                      $start_angle, $end_angle)
     The first 5 arguments are as described above for all plot types.
     $shape : is always 'pie'
     $row : The pie segment index, starting at 0 for the first segment,
            1 for the next segment (counter-clockwise), etc.
     $column : Always 0 (not used).
     $x, $y : Center of the pie, in device coordinates.
     $pie_width : Horizontal diameter of the pie, in pixels.
     $pie_height : Vertical diameter of the pie, in pixels.
     $start_angle : Starting angle for the segment, in clockwise degrees.
     $end_angle : Ending angle for the segment, in clockwise degrees.
          Note: "clockwise degrees" means 360-A where A is an angle measured
          in the conventional sense, from the X axis counter-clockwise.
          For example, a pie segment that starts at the top of the pie
          ("North") and ends at the bottom point ("South") would have
          start_angle=270 and end_angle=90. The start_angle is always
          greater than the end angle. Pie segments are drawn in order,
          counter-clockwise starting at the "East" position.


Generating an image map for pie charts:

The pie segment is defined by the ellipse center point ($x, $y), the two
diameter values ($pie_width, $pie_height), and the start and end angles.
Due to the PHP/GD implementation, PHPlot uses clockwise angles (360-A), so
the start_angle is greater than the end_angle, and the segment is drawn
clockwise from the end_angle to the start_angle.

HTML image maps do not support this shape directly. Instead, your callback
function can approximate the area using one or more polygons.

The method shown in Example 2 in this document approximates the pie segment
area using a polygon with one point at the pie center, one point at each
end of the arc, and zero or more points along the arc , such that the
maximum separation of points along the circumference is no more than 20
degrees. This has been found to produce a good fit for image maps.  More
details on the method can be found in the example below.

Once you have your points (converted to integers, in an array $points with X
and Y values alternating), you can generate a line in the image map as follows:

  $coords = implode(',', $points);
  $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"poly\" coords=\"$coords\""
             .  " title=\"$title_text\" alt=\"$alt_text\" href=\"$url\">\n";

The $url, $title_text, and $alt_text would typically depend on the passed $row.

Refer to Example 2 in this document for a complete example.

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Usage with bubble plots:

With plot type 'bubbles', an image map can be produced which indicates the
area of each bubble.


Arguments to the 'data_points' callback for bubble plots:

  function my_handler($img, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column,
                      $x, $y, $diam)
     The first 5 arguments are as described above for all plot types.
     $shape : is always 'circle'
     $row : The index of the data row, starting with 0 for the first X value,
            1 for the second X value, etc.
     $column : The data set index. This is 0 for the first Y value for a given
            X, 1 for the second Y value for that same X, etc.
     $x, $y : Center of the bubble, in device coordinates.
     $diam : Diameter of the bubble, in pixels.


Generating an image map for bubble plots:

The $shape and parameters are almost compatible with HTML image map markup,
except that PHPlot provides a diameter, and the radius is needed.

Here is an example of generating one area in an image map from a bubble
plot.  You must provide the URL, alternate text, and optionally a title
(tooltip text).  This appends the image map line to a string.  sprintf() is
used to convert the coordinates to integers for cleaner HTML.

  $coords = sprintf("%d,%d,%d", $x, $y, $diam / 2);
  $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"circle\" coords=\"$coords\""
             .. " title=\"$title_text\" alt=\"$alt_text\" href=\"$url\">\n";

The $url, $title_text, and $alt_text would typically depend on the passed
$row and $column.

Other than the above code, a script to generate an image map for a bubbles
plot would be similar to Example 1 in this document, which produces a bar
chart.

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Usage with OHLC plots:

With plot types 'ohlc', 'candlesticks', and 'candlesticks2', an image map can
be produced which indicates the area of each data point. For candlesticks
and candlesticks2 plots, this area is the bounding box containing the
candlestick and its wicks.  For ohlc plots, this area is the bounding box
formed by the vertical line and horizontal ticks.

Arguments to the 'data_points' callback for OHLC plots:

  function my_handler($img, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column,
                      $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2)
     The first 5 arguments are as described above for all plot types.
     $shape : is always 'rect'
     $row : The index of the data row, starting with 0 for the first X value,
            1 for the second X value, etc.
     $column : Always 0 (not used).
     $x1, $y1 : Device coordinates of the upper left corner
     $x2, $y2 : Device coordinates of the lower right corner


Generating an image map for OHLC plots:

The provided $shape and coordinates are compatible with HTML <area> markup.

Here is an example of generating one area in an image map from an OHLC plot.
You must provide the URL, alternate text, and optionally a title (tooltip
text).  This appends the image map line to a string.  sprintf() is used to
convert the coordinates to integers for cleaner HTML.

  $coords = sprintf("%d,%d,%d,%d", $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2);
  $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"rect\" coords=\"$coords\""
             .. " title=\"$title_text\" alt=\"$alt_text\" href=\"$url\">\n";

The $url, $title_text, and $alt_text would typically depend on the passed $row.

Example 1 in this document contains a complete example for bar charts, and
the parameters and usage for OHLC plots is the same.

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Summary of data_points callback parameters:

  Points, Linepoints :
      $img, $passthru, $shape='dot', $row, $column, $x, $y
      Note: x,y is center. You must supply a radius for <area shape=circle>.

  Bars, Stackedbars:
      $img, $passthru, $shape='rect', $row, $column, $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2

  Pie:
      $img, $passthru, $shape='pie', $row, 0, $x, $y, $width, $height,
          $start_angle, $end_angle
      Note: You must fit a polygon to the arc segment for an image map.

  Bubbles:
      $img, $passthru, $shape='circle', $row, $column, $x, $y, $diam
      Note: x,y is center; use diam/2 for radius in <area shape=circle>.

  OHLC, Candlesticks, Candlesticks2:
      $img, $passthru, $shape='rect', $row, 0, $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2


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Example 1: Embedded image bar chart with image map

This produces an HTML page with an embedded image containing a bar chart,
with an image map. "Tool tip" float-over text identifies the bars and
groups, and clicking on a bar provides a popup alert window with the same
information.

<?php
# PHPlot example: Bar chart, embedded image with image map
require_once 'phplot.php';

# This global string accumulates the image map AREA tags.
$image_map = "";

# Data for bar chart:
$data = array(
    array('1950', 40, 95, 20),
    array('1960', 45, 85, 30),
    array('1970', 50, 80, 40),
    array('1980', 48, 77, 50),
    array('1990', 38, 72, 60),
    array('2000', 35, 68, 70),
    array('2010', 30, 67, 80),
);

# Callback for 'data_points': Generate 1 <area> line in the image map:
function store_map($im, $passthru, $shape, $row, $column, $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2)
{
    global $image_map;

    $title = "Group $row, Bar $column";  // Title, also tool-tip text
    $alt = "Region for group $row, bar $column"; // Required alt-text
    $href = "javascript:alert('($row, $column)')"; // Demo URL
    $coords = sprintf("%d,%d,%d,%d", $x1, $y1, $x2, $y2); // Convert to integers

    $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"rect\" coords=\"$coords\""
               .  " title=\"$title\" alt=\"$alt\" href=\"$href\">\n";
}


$plot = new PHPlot(640, 480);
$plot->SetFailureImage(False); // No error images
$plot->SetPrintImage(False); // No automatic output
$plot->SetTitle("PHPlot Example: Bar Chart with Image Map");
$plot->SetImageBorderType('plain');
$plot->SetDataValues($data);
$plot->SetDataType('text-data');
$plot->SetPlotType('bars');
$plot->SetCallback('data_points', 'store_map');
$plot->SetPlotAreaWorld(NULL, 0, NULL, 100);
$plot->DrawGraph();

?><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
     "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title>PHPlot Example: Bar Chart with Image Map</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>PHPlot Example: Bar Chart with Image Map</h1>
<map name="map1">
<?php echo $image_map; ?>
</map>
<p>This is a plot with image map and tooltip text.</p>
<img src="<?php echo $plot->EncodeImage();?>" alt="Plot Image" usemap="#map1">
</body>
</html>

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Example 2: Embedded image pie chart with image map

This produces an HTML page with an embedded image containing a pie chart,
with an image map. The pie segment shapes are interpolated with polygon
points. The image map provides tool-tip text and a clickable area producing
an alert box for each segment. This example also shows use of the data
values. The callback handler accesses the data array to get the current
segment value and uses that in the tool-top text and alert box. This is
dependent on the data type of the array, and the code shown here only works
with data type text-data-single

<?php
# PHPlot example: Pie chart, embedded image with image map
require_once 'phplot.php';

# This global string accumulates the image map AREA tags.
$image_map = "";

# Data for pie chart:
$data = array(
  array('',  20),
  array('',  30),
  array('',  10),
  array('',  40),
  array('',  10),
);

/*
Callback handler for generating an image map for a pie chart.

  NOTE: The code in this function is excluded from the license terms for
  PHPlot, the PHPlot Reference Manual, and the PHPlot Test Suite. You may
  freely copy, use, modify, and redistribute the code in this function.
  Attribution is not necessary.  Or, to put it another way, I am placing
  this function in the public domain.

Arguments:
  $im, $passthru : standard arguments for all callbacks.
  $shape : always 'pie'
  $segment : 0 for the first pie segment, 1 for the next, etc.
  $xc, $yc : Center of the pie, in device coordinates
  $wd, $ht : Pie diameters - width (horizontal), height (vertical)
  $start_angle, $end_angle : Segment arc angles, in degrees, offset from
    360. That is, the values are (360-A) for angle A. This is the way
    PHPlot processes the angles for the GD function imagefilledarc().
    Note that sin(360-A) = -sin(A); and cos(360-A) = cos(A).
    Since the Y axis  (sin) is reversed in device, or image, coordinates
    with Y=0 at the top, this works out correctly.

Method used:
    Approximate a pie segment using a polygon. Note the pie is not necessarily
circular, but is an ellipse.
    +  The 1st point is the pie center.
    +  The 2nd point is on the circumference*, at the start angle.
    +  The last point is on the circumference*, at the end angle.
    +  In between the 2nd and last point are N>=0 additional points on the
circumference*, spaced no more than 20 degrees apart. (20 is chosen by
trial and error for a reasonable fit.) So small segments will be approximated
by a single triangle. Larger segments will have more vertices.

    *Note: These points are actually slightly outside the circumference.
This is done by increasing the two radius values by a small amount (2 pixels).
This produces a better fit, for the case where we want to make sure all the
interior is covered, even if some of the exterior is also included.  (Using
the actual radii would result in the area omitting a small part of the pie
interior. For an image map, this would result in dead spaces.)

    The segment subdivisions are made to have about equal angles. This results
in a closer fit. For example, with a maximum sub-segment arc of 20 degrees,
and a segment of 24 degrees, we make two 12 degree sub-segments rather than a
20 degree and a 4 degree.

    Note: Web image map coordinates have 0,0 in upper left, so Y is reversed.

The pass-through argument gets the data array. This is used to include the
pie segment value in the URL and/or tooltip. This will only work with data
type text-data-single, where array values map 1:1 to segment values.
*/
function store_map($im, $data, $shape, $segment, $unused,
                   $xc, $yc, $wd, $ht, $start_angle, $end_angle)
{
    global $image_map;

    // Choose the largest step_angle <= 20 degrees that divides the segment
    // into equal parts. (20 degrees is chosen as a threshold.)
    // Note start_angle > end_angle due to reversal (360-A) of arguments.
    $arc_angle = $start_angle - $end_angle;
    $n_steps = (int)ceil($arc_angle / 20);
    $step_angle = $arc_angle / $n_steps;

    // Radius along horizontal and vertical, plus a tiny adjustment factor.
    $rx = $wd / 2 + 2;
    $ry = $ht / 2 + 2;
    // Push the initial point into the array: the center of the pie.
    $points = array($xc, $yc);

    // Loop by step_angle from end_angle to start_angle.
    // Don't use "$theta += $step_angle" because of cumulative error.
    // Note $theta and $done_angle are in radians; $step_angle and $end_angle
    // are in degrees.
    $done_angle = deg2rad($start_angle);

    for ($i = 0; ; $i++) {
      // Advance to next step, but not past the end:
      $theta = min($done_angle, deg2rad($end_angle + $i * $step_angle));

      // Generate a point at the current angle:
      $points[] = (int)($xc + $rx * cos($theta));
      $points[] = (int)($yc + $ry * sin($theta));

      // All done after generating a point at done_angle.
      if ($theta >= $done_angle) break;
    }

    // Demonstration data: Title (and tool-tip text), alt text, URL:
    // Fetch segment value from data arrayL
    $value = $data[$segment][1];
    $title = "Segment $segment = $value";
    $alt = "Region for segment $segment";
    $href = "javascript:alert('Segment $segment = $value')";
    $coords = implode(',', $points);

    // Generate the image map area:
    $image_map .= "  <area shape=\"poly\" coords=\"$coords\""
               .  " title=\"$title\" alt=\"$alt\" href=\"$href\">\n";
}

$plot = new PHPlot(640, 480);
// Disable error images, since this script produces HTML:
$plot->SetFailureImage(False);
// Disable automatic output of the image:
$plot->SetPrintImage(False);
// Set up the rest of the plot:
$plot->SetTitle("PHPlot Example: Pie Chart with Image Map");
$plot->SetImageBorderType('plain');
$plot->SetDataValues($data);
$plot->SetDataType('text-data-single');
$plot->SetPlotType('pie');
// Set the data_points callback which will generate the image map.
// Include the data array as the pass-through argument, for tooltip text:
$plot->SetCallback('data_points', 'store_map', $data);
// Produce the graph; this also creates the image map via callback:
$plot->DrawGraph();

// Now output the HTML page, with image map and embedded image:
?><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
     "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title>PHPlot Example: Pie Chart with Image Map</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>PHPlot Example: Pie Chart with Image Map</h1>
<map name="map1">
<?php echo $image_map; ?>
</map>
<p>This is a plot with image map and tooltip text.</p>
<img src="<?php echo $plot->EncodeImage();?>" alt="Plot Image" usemap="#map1">
</body>
</html>


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Implementation Notes and Limitations:

Since most PHPlot scripts will not produce image maps, the burden of
converting data points into a format for HTML image maps was left to the
implementation in the callback function. This is why PHPlot passes the
diameter values it already calculated (instead of radius values), and why
pie chart segments must be interpolated by the callback function.

You can generate image maps for error plots (data type data-data-error)
with points and linepoints plot types, but the image map areas will not
include the error bars. For these plot types, the only the coordinates of
the data points are provided.

For OHLC plots (candlesticks, candlesticks2, and ohlc plot types) there is
no way to get the coordinates of individual features (such as the
candlestick body rather than the high point wick). PHPlot only provides the
bounding box rectangle for the overall data point graphic.

PHPlot does not provide the data values from the data array that go with
the points. If you need these values, for example in tooltips, your callback
function needs to get them from the data array, using the $row and $column
index values. This may be complex for pie charts (for example, if you want
tooltip text to show the percentage value of the pie segment). Example 2
above shows access to data values for the simple case of data type
'text-data-single'.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Image maps with non-embedded image data:

It is also possible to generate an image map when your PHPlot script
produces an image in the normal way (not embedded) and returns it to the
browser as image data.  But your script will need to run twice: once to to
generate the PHPlot image, and once to generate the containing HTML page
with the image map.  (You can use two separate scripts instead, but this is
not recommended, since both operations must create identical plots so the
image map areas correspond to the plot areas.)

In this example, the script normally generates an HTML page. The page
contains an image map, generated with PHPlot, and also an <img> image tag
which points back to the same script to have it generate the plot image.
When requesting the image, the script adds a parameter 'mode=plot' to the
URL. This tells the second execution of the script to generate the image
data instead of the HTML page.

The obvious drawback to this method is that you are processing a complete
plot twice each time a plot is needed. The first time, only the image map
is needed, and the plot itself is discarded. This is inefficient, especially
if your plotting script needs to query a database or perform extensive
calculations.

Another concern is if your script queries a database, the data could change
between the two uses of the script, resulting in an image map and plot
which do not correlate.

The rest of this section contains annotated code from an example.

Start by checking for the mode parameter:
    # Check the URL parameter to determine the mode:
    $do_html = empty($_GET['mode']) || $_GET['mode'] != 'plot';

The callback handler is the same as the example above, in that it appends
to the global string $image_map one line from the image map.
    # Callback for 'data_points' : Generate 1 line in the image map.
    function store_map($im, $unused, $shape, $row, $column, ...) // Pseudo-code
    { .... }

The generate_html() function creates the containing HTML page. Only parts
of the code are shown.
    function generate_html()
    {
        global $image_map;

Create a self-referencing URL with mode=plot parameter for the <img> tag:
        # Pick separator depending on if the URL already has parameters:
        $sep = empty($_SERVER['QUERY_STRING']) ? '?' : '&';
        # URL to ourself, with parameter:
        $url = htmlspecialchars($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] . $sep .  'mode=plot');

Now you generate the HTML page:
        echo "<html>\n<head>\n...";
To create the image map:
        echo "<map name=\"map1\">\n$image_map\n</map>\n";
To include the plot image:
        echo "<img src=\"$url\" usemap=\"#map1\">
Produce the rest of the HTMl page as needed.
This ends the generate_html function.

In the main body of your script, create a PHPlot object and configure the
plot as usual.  Set the data_points callback (you need only do this in
the case of generating HTML, not the image case). There are two other places
where the operation differs for the HTML or image generation, based on the
$do_html flag: disabling automatic output with SetPrintImage, and calling
the generate_html function at the end.
    $plot = new PHPlot(800, 600);
    if ($do_html) {
        // Do not output the image in this mode:
        $plot->SetPrintImage(False);
        // Set the callback for image map generation:
        $plot->SetCallback('data_points', 'store_map');
    }
    ... // Set up the plot, data values, plot type, etc.
    // Output the image (in plot mode), or build the image map (in html mode):
    $plot->DrawGraph();
    if ($do_html) generate_html();

That's all. If $do_html is true, no image will be produced (due to
SetPrintImage(False)), and generate_html() will be called. If $do_html is
false, DrawGraph() will output the plot image, and the map data will be
not be produced or output.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
History:

2012-02-19 First version of data_points callback committed, for next
           release PHPlot-5.7.0 as an experimental feature.

2011-11-25 Feature request #2442041 was written requesting data for image
           maps. As the feature request author pointed out, PHPlot was
           now able to produce image data embedded in an HTML file, so it
           was now practical to also generate image map data.

2007-07-07 Feature request #1749683 was written requesting data for image
           maps. The request was closed as rejected, because there was no
           good way at the time for a script to generate the image file
           and the map and make them both available at the same time.

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